1886 at Parq Vancouver

Monday, December 25, 2017 1 No tags Permalink 1

I don’t often showcase my work on this blog (most of it is behind the scenes – trend forecasting, concepts, formulations/recipe development, etc), so I’m especially excited about this post. I spent fall in Vancouver developing a tea program for the recently opened Parq Vancouver

[Photo by Bill Milne]

…focusing on the high rollers room, tea and whiskey bar, and 1886 (the fine dining Chinese restaurant…that’s me in the photo :).

We created this tea trolley (scroll to bottom of this post for more details on how the trolley functions…here I am steeping on opening week) to showcase a rotation of 12 Chinese teas. We worked with five excellent tea suppliers, selecting teas that best compliment the food and also ones I personally feel are wonderful and should be shared…

…here’s a look at the menu. Tea pricing is per person. Here’s every tea on the menu, from top down…

White Peony / Bai Mu Dan

Jasmine Green

Milk Oolong / Jin Xuan

Big Red Robe / Da Hong Pao

Golden Beautiful Eyebrow / Jin Jun Mei

2012 Golden Pu’erh, Shu

2013 Pu’erh Mao Cha, Sheng

Chrysanthemum

Silver Needle / Baihao Yinzhen

Iron Goddess of Mercy / Tieguanyin

2009 Gao Shan Zhai, Yiwu Pu’erh, Sheng

Yellow Tea Buds / Meng Ding Huang Ya

Now let’s take a closer look at the trolley…I wish I could have an extra (slightly smaller one) one made for my own home. The trolley was custom built to be completely self-sufficient. We worked with a trolley maker in Brooklyn (she’s made many restaurant trolleys but this was her first tea trolley, so special!)

There’s a water catchment with a removable surface so that we can offer tableside gaiwan service for the extra special teas. There are two temperature controlled kettles with a burner tucked inside the case. This is so we can keep the water at the right temperature while the trolley is “live” in the dining room. I love this trolley very much.

Depending on the type of tea that’s ordered, we have a mix of large/small glass pots and gaiwans. Every tea is weighed on the gram scale in front of guests. There’s storage to hold beautiful pu’erh knifes, tea towels, tea picks and all sorts of pieces and parts that make drinking tea wonderful.

[Photo by Bill Milne]

Hope to see you there ^-^

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